Thursday, June 5, 2014

Fresh-Cut Friday June Roses




Hello and welcome to June's edition of Fresh-Cut Friday. 
I'm so glad you popped in to say hi and see what is happening here at RoseVignettes. 





June's flower of the month is the Rose. In the language of flowers the Rose in general means some degree of love or desire.  A yellow rose can mean jealousy or even a decrease in love. 

Gasp!



The Rose of Lancaster, one of the oldest roses know to still exist can mean war. 

In fact here is a little history for you (an excerpt from the Old Farmers Almanac) : 

"The roses' links to antiquity are strong, which is why many gardeners love them. 

The oldest rose planted today was in existence some 2,000 years before the birth of Christ. Rosa gallica var officialis migrated from Persia (Iran) trough Turkey to France and finally into England in time to be renamed 'Red Rose of Lancaster', which figured prominently in the Wars of the Roses during the 15th  century. It's also known as 'Apothecary's Rose', because during the past thousand years it has been used by herbalists, including the fictitious Brother Cadfael (lead character in a series of books by Ellis Peters). 

The intensely fragrant 'Desiree Parmentier', a Gallica rose, was named after the Frenchwoman who became queen of Sweden. As a young woman, she financed Napoleon Bonaparte's second campaign  with her jewels after her father had refused his plea for money. When one of Napoleon's marshals was crowned king of Sweden, Bonaparte introduced Desiree to the king, who was in the market for a wife. 

Souvenir de la Maimaison', first grown in Joesphine Bonaparte's Chateau garden at Maimaison, near Paris was beloved by Catherine the Great, who filled the Imperial Garden at St. Petersburg with these pale pink Bourbons. "

So the the rose is not to be taken for granted. 

Just so you are aware ...
Roses are on sale at Safeway this week. 
As are Peonies! 
I bought a dozen white roses. 
I actually split them up and used them all over the house.


Here they are in my little pine hutch. 



It is pretty clear that roses are in season right now. 
Look at the size of those buds.


The size of teacups!




I'm going to be joining:
Lavender Garden Cottage





All right now! I know you have flowers to share. 










9 comments:

Poppy said...

Hi Liz,

Wow, so much history behind the rose and very intriguing, indeed! Your white roses look so elegant nestled in all those pretty places around your home. I was so excited to be in Canada this spring, hoping to enjoy lilacs and peonies, but the ice storm did not grant my wish!

Thanks for hosting and have a wonderful weekend!

Poppy

Liz @ Sit With Me In My Garden said...

That was interesting to read about the roses. The yellow roses look so cute in your pine hutch! I'm thrilled my Rose bush finally showed signs of being alive! Thanks for hosting!

Juju at Tales of Whimsy.com said...

I did not know that. How awesome.

You've made me want to rush out and buy flowers.

Art @ Home said...

Hi, Liz! My post isn't ready yet, but I promise I'll have it ready to go by the end of the day.

xo,
RJ

Stacey said...

Joining you today. :)

Laura Ingalls Gunn said...

Love, love, LOVE the rose!

Technically my post today contains not one single fresh cut flower. But I think you'll give me a pass because I share the floral gardens of Paris. :)

Art @ Home said...

I enjoyed reading all about roses. I had no idea they originated in Persia!

Thanks for hosting. I love the roses in the teacups. So cute! Darling idea for a party.

xo,
RJ

Rosemary and Thyme said...

Oh my. I did not know that the rose dated back that far. It is incredible. Your blue and white tea cups are lovely and you have displayed them beautifully in that charming hutch.

Thanks for hosting.

Janet

FABBY'S LIVING said...

Your pine hutch with the lovely teacups with a rose is awesome! Magazine worth, I love it!
Thank you for hosting and have a lovely weekend.
FABBY